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Photos: MUTEMATH @ The Bamboozle

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

I'd never photographed Mutemath before, but I'd always seen amazing shots from their shows, which told me one of two things: Either photographers who shoot Mutemath are more talented than your average bear, or that Mutemath's live performance rocks. After shooting the group at The Bamboozle, I can say with confidence that at least the latter is true.

For this music photographer, Mutemath stole the show for the second day of ‘Boozle.

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

Photographer's Notes:

Mutemath put on an incredible show. You know that it's going to be good when the drummer tapes his headphones onto his head. It bears repeating and clarification: Drummer Darren King tapes his monitoring headphones to his head with ducktape. Not just once around, but several layers. Under the chin.

In fact, King was the first band member to take the stage and made a small show of the ceremony, to the delight of photographers and fans alike.

Photos: Mutemath performing at The Bamboozle 2010

As for the rest of the show, it only got better.

For me, the highlight was when singer Paul Meany came down from the stage and into the  pit with – I don't know – let's just say it was an instrument that seemed to have a touchpad for the neck and which was held together by black ducktape. You can see Meany in the pit and engaging fans in the lead shot.

End Notes:

Keytar, frontman in the pit, homemade instruments, and ducktapping headphones – what more could any concert photographer ask for, really? Besides AAA.

Questions or comments? Leave a comment below, and let me know what you thought of this post.

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My Camera DSLR and Lenses for Concert Photography

Nikon D850:
I use two Nikon D850 for my live music photography. A true do-it-all DSLR with amazing AF, fast response, and no shortage of resolution.
nikon-24-70mm-f28-lens-squareNikon 24-70mm f/2.8:
For most gigs, the 24-70mm is my go-to lens. Exceptional image quality at wide apertures and super-functional range.
Nikon-70-200-squareNikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR:
A perfect pair to the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8, I can basically shoot any job with the midrange and this lens. Superb image quality.
nikon-14-24mm-f28-lens-squareNikon 14-24mm f/2.8:
Ultra-wide perspective, ridiculously sharp even wide open at f/2.8. I love using this lens up-close and personal, where it excels.
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