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Photos: Lamb of God @ The Pageant

Atmosphere during Lamb of God's performance at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung)

This was a straight out brutal, relentless show. Between a wild light show, a few hundred on-stage hair whips and Randy Blythe trashing around like a man possessed, Lamb of God gave a crushing performance.

Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung)

Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Atmosphere during Lamb of God's performance at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung) Lamb of God performing at the Pageant in St. Louis on November 7, 2012. (Todd Owyoung)

Photographer’s Notes:

Cameras Used:

Lenses Used:

After seeing the relatively great lighting for All That Remains, I was very interested to see what headliners Lamb of God would bring for their stage production. As it turned out, the show was pretty fantastic.

Lighting was all over the place with lots of very intese colored lighting. The great thing about the lighting mix for this show that all these washes were punctuated with contrasting colors as well. It was never just green or red or blue lighting individually – there was always a mix. This effect made for a very striking and saturated light show that, while challenging, made for great photography.

In terms of lenses, the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 was king. Even though metal is often well served by an ultra-wide angle lens, the monitors at the front of the stage meant that 24mm was plenty wide.

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There are 8 comments

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    • Todd

      Hey Groovehouse,

      Yeah, sometimes you just gotta embrace those monitors. I think we all find them a pain, but there are some instances where they can add a level of context to the shoot as well. Most of the time I do try to frame them out, though.

  1. JPeg

    I am so excited to have a photo pass to shoot these guys this FRIDAY!!! I like to do a little research on a band/performer to see how they use the stage and where they hold the mic and so on. The monitors are going to be a challenge, but you did a superb job incorporating them and making the photos have a harder edge to them. The colors are fantastic too.


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